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Bloodsport (Kumite tournament)
« en: Marzo 06, 2009, 12:39:33 am »
bueno abro este post para poner lo de la tabla del torneo de bloodsport, y para poner otra cosa q he encontrado sobre el torneo real en el q esta basada la pelicula, q habla sobre lo q es cierto y lo q no en la peli, es bastante curioso

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kumite_bracket.gif

lo de la tabla de torneo yo creo q se corresponde con lo q sale en la peli, faltan nombres q corresponderan a las peleas q no se ven, asi q no se puede saber si es real del todo



http://www.chasingthefrog.com/reelfaces/bloodsport.php

"My involvement in that tournament was part of a plan, launched in 1975, to infiltrate the criminal organizations that organized the fights. The original idea was to participate in the Kumite tournament and make a few contacts. We initially assumed I would lose, but eventually I became one of the best Kumite fighters to ever participate in the event."
-Frank Dux

Questioning the Story:

Is the underground Kumite Tournament in the movie Bloodsport real?

Jean Claude Van Damme BloodsportNo known Martial Arts governing body will acknowledge the existence of the Kumite tournament, which is supposedly a no-holds-barred mixed martial arts competition held in secret every five years, according to the movie Bloodsport. In the 1988 film, we see Jean-Claude Van Damme's fictional character Frank Dux triumphing over a ruthless fighter named Chong Li, portrayed by Bolo Yeung (who was 50-years-old).

The real Frank Dux has claimed that he did, in fact, attend and win the 1975 Kumite; an experience which became the inspiration for the onscreen events in the 1988 movie Bloodsport.
However, according to Frank's accounts, "The Kumite" was held in Jamaica in 1975, not in Hong Kong like we see in the film. A great deal of controversy has arisen around Dux's own past and his stories of The Kumite. No recognized, legitimate, martial arts practitioner has ever heard of such a tournament actually existing. Other inspiring martial artists have claimed to have fought in similar events, but many believe that these Kumite-like tales are just that, elaborate stories used to garner undeserved recognition.

What does the word kumite mean?

The Japanese word kumite means 'sparring'. It is one of the three main areas of karate training, along with kata and kihon (form and fundamentals).

Can Frank Dux prove that he fought in a tournament called the Kumite?

DuxDux (right) possesses what he claims is his 1975 Kumite tournament trophy. Yet shortly after the movie's release in May of 1988, Los Angeles Times writer John Johnson published an article claiming that Dux had made everything up. Johnson based some of his findings on the word of a North Hollywood vendor, who stated that Dux's Kumite trophy didn't come from a 1975 tournament in Jamaica, but rather it was merely ordered and picked up by Dux just a few miles from his Southern California home. In an interview with James Hom, Dux responded to the article's claims by saying, "That article made a big deal that the Kumite trophy was fake. But the receipt they claimed was proof didn't even have my name spelled correctly! They spelled it Ducks: D-U-C-K-S!"
-jameshom.com

Did the real Frank Dux have to evade U.S. Military police to fight in the Kumite?


No. In the movie Bloodsport, Jean-Claude Van Damme's character is a valuable U.S. Military Operative who tries to evade two military police agents so that he can fight in the Kumite. The real Frank Dux claims that he was working undercover for the CIA at the time, and that he only participated in the Kumite in order to get closer to the Asian criminal element that organized the fights. He says that he never expected to win.

Was Frank Dux really an inexpendable soldier in the U.S. Military?

Likely not. Frank Dux's book The Secret Man talks of his experiences in Vietnam and as a CIA Operative. Yet, using the Freedom of Information Act, researcher B.G. Burkett obtained a copy of Dux's Marine Corps records, and thereby discovered that Dux served in the Marine Corps Reserve in the U.S. from 1975 to 1981, never seeing any overseas action. If these records are correct, it means that Dux was not even in the military during the United States efforts in Vietnam, since the U.S. left Vietnam in 1972 and the North took it over in 1975. For more details, see B.G. Burkett's book Stolen Valor: How the Vietnam Generation Was Robbed of Its Heroes and Its History (Verity Press, 1998), ISBN 096670360X.

Was Frank Dux really a CIA Operative as his book claims?

Dux's book The Secret Man tells of his often graphically violent James Bond-like experiences as a CIA operative, doing such things as killing a mass murderer and aiding the U.S.S.R. in investigating what proved to be a scam anthrax scare. In the book, Dux describes himself as "sleek and agile," a professional martial artist "considered by many the fastest human alive," a man able to break bullet-proof glass with a blow from his bare hand, "a great hunter" who as a CIA operative worked "on the edge of a psychological razor". The problem is that no one can prove that Dux is lying and Dux is unable to convincingly prove that he's not. His alleged contact in the CIA, director William Casey, passed away from a brain tumor in 1987, almost ten years before Dux's book was published. William Casey was not around to either confirm or denounce Dux's claims.

Did Frank Dux sue Soldier of Fortune Magazine for attempting to smear his military past?


Yes. The real Frank Dux sued Soldier of Fortune Magazine for defamation of character after they praised B.G. Burkett's book (see above) and published a photo of Lance Corporal Dux wearing Navy jump wings and four rows of ribbons headed by a Navy Cross calling him a wannabe. Dux says that he and Soldier of Fortune publisher Robert K. Brown were intending to launch similar movie projects, and that Brown wanted to discredit his competition so that his own project would succeed. -jameshom.com

Did Frank Dux sue Jean-Claude Van Damme over a script titled The Kumite?


Frank Dux vs Jean-Claude Van Damme trialIn October of 1998, the real Frank Dux sued his former friend and the man who portrayed him in the movie Bloodsport (1988) for breach of an oral contract. Dux, who had been dating Jean-Claude Van Damme's sister-in-law, penned a script for a movie that focused on the Kumite tournament. Known simply as The Kumite, the film was to utilize Jean-Claude Van Damme's rising star power to capture a bigger budget with real world locations. In the trial Frank Dux claimed that Van Damme had verbally promised him 2.5 percent of the movie's box office gross. Dux's original script, which he had received $50,000 for only after complaining to the Writer's Guild of America, had been reworked by another writer into what had become Jean-Claude Van Damme's 1996 movie The Quest. The Dux vs. Van Damme trial was heavily covered by Court TV. In the end, Frank Dux lost the case and subsequently ended his friendship with Van Damme.

Did the real Frank Dux nearly lose his life to a brain tumor?


Yes. In 1993 Frank Dux was apparently very ill with a brain tumor. He spoke of this experience in an interview with Martial Arts Magazine, "In 1993, when I began writing this memoir, neither monetary gain nor fame seemed relevant at the time, as I was extremely ill, due to a brain tumor. ...Ultimately, I would become comatose due to surgical complications resulting in a spinal fluid leak that led to spinal meningitis. When I recovered, I realized I wasn't living up to that responsibility which outweighs personal gain. What needed to be said could have died with me, so I tossed my completed first book and wrote this book [The Secret Man] instead, fully aware that if I lived I would be subjecting myself to criticism by envious and would be compromising my personal safety."

Did Frank Dux set a record for breaking bulletproof glass with his bare hands?


This is another of Dux's claims that has created a lot of controversy. In the 1998 Dux vs. Van Damme trial, Frank's friend for over twenty years, Richard Alexander, testified against him saying that Dux's feat of breaking bulletproof glass was a hoax. He said that it was really Plexiglas that Dux had found. Alexander called Dux a "long-time friend" but also a liar who "tries to get something for nothing." Dux's attorney Steven Kramer attempted to discredit Alexander by accusing him of having a grudge against his client.

Did Frank Dux create his own martial arts fighting style?

Yes. Frank created Dux Ryu, a fighting style reminiscent of Jujitsu that includes elements of other arts.

Did the real Frank Dux come up with the movie's title, 'Bloodsport'?

Frank claims that the movie title 'Bloodsport' was his idea. In a radio interview from "On The Edge" hosted by Kelly S. Worden, Frank talked about how he came up with the movie's title years earlier when he was nineteen and fighting in a junkyard in Tijuana, "I'm a young kid and I'm getting really kinda nervous and I... the one way I fight... for me I fight my feelings of nervousness is I use a lot of humor sometimes...and so I immediately started doing this Howard Cosell...ah...imitation and said 'Here we are'..ya know...'at the Red Cross'..you know..'blood drive' ya know. 'Bloodsport... where everyone's guaranteed to give an ounce.' ..you know [laughs]...and that's where that whole term came from. And then we're sitting around with Mark DiSalle he says...he was trying to think of a name and a title for the movie and I said, 'well why don't you just call it Bloodsport.'" Listen to the entire radio interview below.

Have any sequels ever been made to the movie Bloodsport?


Yes. In 1996, Bloodsport II: The Next Kumite was released direct-to-video. The movie featured Daniel Bernhardt, Pat Morita, and Donald Gibb, who reprised his role as Ray 'Tiny' Jackson from the first Bloodsport movie. Gibb was the only returning character. In the following years, Bloodsport 3 and Bloodsport 4 were released in 1997 and the latter in 1999. Both films featured Swiss actor and martial artist Daniel Bernhardt in the lead role.
« última modificación: Marzo 06, 2009, 12:42:43 am por AJ »